Wrong, Wrong, Wrong

[You’ll have to take my word that this post was planned before Megan left a comment to much the same effect on Facebook. I still wrote it, because I love sharing space trivia, but because it took several more days to finish, my summer schlamperei cannot be questioned.]

Last week I discussed a mistaken explanation in one of my engineering textbooks. The specific explanation was wrong, but there’s two other issues with that innocuous caption in chapter one.

Hibbeler attributes a NASA image to a PhotoShop artist on Shutterstock. Now there’s nothing wrong with getting images from there. I find them a bit overthetop personally, but when has that ever been an impediment to the authors of textbooks on serious topics? Never, that’s when.

But why would you go through a stock image company when NASA images are public domain? It seems unnecessary, strongly suggests that author or graphic artist did a quick Google search, rather than having a clear image in mind. That brings us to the other problem.

This is a very specific, very recognizable image of Bruce McCandless operating the Manned Maneuvering Unit during STS-41B. You even see the same cloud patterns on the NASA website. And the last I heard, Bruce McCandless is a man.

Misgendering McCandless was obviously done for inclusion, but would it have been so hard to get a picture of a woman astronaut? It certainly would go further toward fixing the image of female spacetravelers in the reader’s mind.

Unfortunately for Hibbeler, there aren’t any pictures of women EVAing without a tether because no woman has ever operated the MMU. If that seems problematic, consider that the MMU was an experimental piece of technology that was really too dangerous to use regularly. Only six astronauts ever wore them, the last in November of 19841. After the Challenger disaster, NASA cancelled all the potential flights which might use the MMU and unofficially retired them from use.

But, we don’t really need a picture of a female astronaut operating untethered, because Hibbeler got it wrong. Astronauts aren’t weightless in orbit because they’re far removed from Earth’s gravity; they’re weightless because they’re falling around Earth at the same rate as their spacecraft and everything in it2. We can use an interior photo, this classic picture of Mae Jemison aboard Endeavour being a logical choice:

mae_jemison_in_space

Now was that really so hard?


1To be explicit about it: including that final mission, only four American women had reached orbit, and only one had performed an EVA. The Soviet Union, meanwhile, only ever sent up two female cosmonauts. Tereshkova, in 1963, was basically a publicity stunt: she never returned to space and the Soviets resumed all-male crews until Svetlana Savitskaya launched in 1982, by which point it was clear that American women were going to space to stay. Nevertheless, Savitskaya beat Kathryn Sullivan to the first female spacewalk by 78 days.

2If we wanted pictures where the inverse squared law has kicked in, our selection is limited to the deep space EVAs during Apollo 15, 16, and 17. Performed during the coast back to Earth, terrestrial gravity had lessened, though their weightlessness was still attributable to free fall. However, our selection is all-male: Al Worden, Ken Mattingly, and Ron Evans.

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